Great Lakes Northern Forest Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

Great Lakes Northern Forest CESU logo

The Great Lakes Northern Forest (GLNF) Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) is a regional network of faculty, specialists, managers, and staff from leading academic institutions, conservation organizations, and federal agencies. All units transcend political and institutional boundaries to improve the scientific base for managing public lands. They provide resource managers with high quality scientific research, technical assistance, and education. The GLNF CESU seeks to resolve resource problems at multiple scales using interdisciplinary ecosystem studies involving the biological, physical, social, and cultural sciences. The GLNF CESU has been hosted by the University of Minnesota’s Department of Forest Resources since 2002.

 

Join the GLNF CESU

2022-2027 Master Agreement

 

Solicitation for CESU Cooperator to complete NHA Evaluation for Abraham Lincoln NHA

June 15, 2022

The non-profit Looking for Lincoln acts as the coordinating entity for the 43-county heritage area and partners with Lincoln Home National Historic Site, local communities, organizations, and individuals dedicated to enhancing the communities and landscapes of central Illinois through recognition and support of their significant natural, cultural, and historical legacies.

Delivering Scalable Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Management Technologies in the Ohio Region

June 7, 2022

Aquatic nuisance species, including harmful algae, impact US waterways (including those maintained by USACE), infrastructure, and associated resources across the Nation; it’s estimated that Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) cause an estimated $1B per year in lost tourism revenue alone. In response, innovative, cost-effective, and scalable technologies for early detection, prevention, and management of aquatic nuisance species are required.

Delivering Scalable Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Prevention Technologies in the Ohio Region

June 3, 2022

Aquatic nuisance species, including harmful algae, impact USACE waterways (including those maintained by USACE), infrastructure, operations, and associated resources across the Nation; it’s estimated that Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) cause an estimated $1B per year in lost tourism revenue alone. In response, innovative, cost-effective, and scalable technologies for early detection, prevention, and management of aquatic nuisance species are required.

Mapping Invasive Species with Unmanned Aircraft Systems Based Remote Sensing at Naval Support Activity Crane, Crane, Indiana

May 31, 2022

Responses to this Request for Statements of Interest (RSOI) will be used to identify potential Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) partners for a project to (1) evaluate the viability and success of using UAS, advanced sensors and large data sets to identify, map, and quantify invasive plant species on a landscape scale and (2) develop protocols and remote sensing packages for streamlined invasive species monitoring at NSA Crane.